The Peoples’ Hadith: Evidence for Popular Tradition on Hadith as Physical Object in the First Centuries of Islam

The Prophet’s documents comprise a category of objects that are the intentions of the Prophet, legally binding texts, and physical objects that touched the Prophet all at once. Reports of these documents are found in various genres of medieval Islamic literature, where they are frequently transmitte...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Arabica
Main Author: Mirza, Sarah Z.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Published: 2016
In:Arabica
Year: 2016, Volume: 63, Issue: 1/2, Pages: 30-63
Further subjects:B Hadith Bedouin Prophet’s documents popular tradition subaltern early Islamic historiography
B Hadith Bédouins documents du Prophète tradition populaire subalterne historiographie islamique
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:The Prophet’s documents comprise a category of objects that are the intentions of the Prophet, legally binding texts, and physical objects that touched the Prophet all at once. Reports of these documents are found in various genres of medieval Islamic literature, where they are frequently transmitted through family isnāds. While these reports are self-consciously geared toward recording the intentions of the Prophet, in effect they reflect the concern of the subalterns of hadith literature to locate themselves somewhere within the narrative of the Prophet’s life. The reports investigated here thus preserve an element of what hadith meant to Bedouin recipients, revealing a pre-canonical arena for hadith in which hadith behaved not as text but as physical object, as a “hadith-object.”1
Les documents du Prophète comportent une catégorie d’objets qui sont les intentions du Prophète, textes légalement contraignants et des objets physiques que le Prophète toucha au moins une fois. Les récits sur ces documents se trouvent dans différents genres de la littérature islamique médiévale, où ils sont fréquemment rapportés au moyen d’isnāds familiaux. Bien que ces récits visent consciemment à préserver les intentions du Prophète, en réalité, ils reflètent les préoccupations de personnages secondaires de la littérature de hadith, désireux de se situer quelque part dans la trame narrative de la vie du Prophète. Ainsi, les récits examinés ici conservent un élément de ce que signifiait le hadith pour ses destinataires bédouins, dévoilant un stade précanonique du hadith dans lequel le hadith ne se conçoit pas comme un texte mais comme un objet physique ou un « hadith-objet ».
ISSN:1570-0585
Contains:In: Arabica
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/15700585-12341382