Capakoba, the Mayo Easter Ceremonial Impersonator: Explanations of Ritual Clowning

Data, describing and analyzing the anomalous role of the Mexican Mayo Indian ritual impersonator are utilized to evaluate four explanations of ritual impersonation: historical, psychological-affective, sociological, and cultural-cognitive. The cultural-cognitive explanation interprets the fact that...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal for the scientific study of religion
Main Author: Crumrine, N. Ross
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [1969]
In:Journal for the scientific study of religion
Year: 1969, Volume: 8, Issue: 1, Pages: 1-22
Further subjects:B Easter
B Ceremonies
B Social interaction
B Mourning rituals
B Religious rituals
B Mental stimulation
B Social structures
B Clowns
B Processions
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Description
Summary:Data, describing and analyzing the anomalous role of the Mexican Mayo Indian ritual impersonator are utilized to evaluate four explanations of ritual impersonation: historical, psychological-affective, sociological, and cultural-cognitive. The cultural-cognitive explanation interprets the fact that Capakobam protect the customs while at the same time they are burlesquing them. They "know no shame" yet they "confess on behalf of the community." This anomalous role of Capakoba mediates numerous other oppositions: human-animal, living-dead, male-female, child-adult, health-sickness. The conflicting portrayal of opposing themes creates cognitive dissonance which enhances the final traditional solution when it is presented. Through the role of ritual impersonator, numerous oppositions and conflicts within the structure of culture and society are ritually mediated, ritual learning takes place, and individuals better understand and more deeply identify with their cultures and societies.
ISSN:1468-5906
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal for the scientific study of religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.2307/1385250