Greece

This chapter explores the term mágos and its cognates – and to what degree such terms signified “ambiguous or unsanctioned ritual.” Before the end of the 4th century BCE mágos and mágeia shifted from mostly ambiguous terms for itinerant religious entrepreneurs to designations with either positive ph...

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Détails bibliographiques
Publié dans:Guide to the study of ancient magic
Autres titres:Cultural constructions of ambiguous, unsanctioned, or illegitimate ritual
Auteur principal: Graf, Fritz 1944-
Type de support: Électronique Article
Langue:Anglais
Vérifier la disponibilité: HBZ Gateway
Publié: Brill 2019
Dans: Guide to the study of ancient magic
Année: 2019, Pages: 115-138
Accès en ligne: Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Description
Résumé:This chapter explores the term mágos and its cognates – and to what degree such terms signified “ambiguous or unsanctioned ritual.” Before the end of the 4th century BCE mágos and mágeia shifted from mostly ambiguous terms for itinerant religious entrepreneurs to designations with either positive philosophical or negative moral connotations. But a wider array of terms applied to religious specialists in ancient Greece, including mantis, agúrtēs, and góēs, associated with three forms of ambiguous rituals: thusiai, epōidē, and pharmaka. The transformation of these categories that began in the 4th century BCE continued with the outlawing of these rituals in Christian imperial laws.
ISBN:9004390758
Contient:Enthalten in: Guide to the study of ancient magic
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/9789004390751_008