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After the enclosure of the Saint-Agnes convent at Maaseik in 1430, the regular canonesses had to learn how to live within the claustrum. They received support from at least two Carthusian monks: James of Gruitrode, prior of the charterhouse in Liège, and Denys the Carthusian from the charterhouse of...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Church history and religious culture
Main Author: van Aelst, José
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: 2016
In:Church history and religious culture
Year: 2016, Volume: 96, Issue: 1/2, Pages: 65-79
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Maaseik / Canonesses / Carthusians
Further subjects:B Saint Agnes, Maaseik Regular canonesses Carthusians Dionysius of Rijkel James of Gruitrode late medieval reform
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:After the enclosure of the Saint-Agnes convent at Maaseik in 1430, the regular canonesses had to learn how to live within the claustrum. They received support from at least two Carthusian monks: James of Gruitrode, prior of the charterhouse in Liège, and Denys the Carthusian from the charterhouse of Roermond. Both Carthusians maintained a regular contact and exchanged literature. James seemingly had a close relation with the nuns: he helped them enlarge their corpus of relevant religious literature, and there is evidence that he was involved in practical matters of the convent. Denys corresponded with the mater of the canonesses, at whose request he sent an elaborate instruction on life within the enclosed convent, De vita inclusarum. In this triangle of religious relations, the Carthusians, experts in enclosed life, took their pastoral responsibility to support the reform of the canonesses and used the means available to them: the written word.
ISSN:1871-2428
Contains:In: Church history and religious culture
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/18712428-09601004