In Two Minds? African Experience and Preferment in umca and the Journey to Independence in Tanganyika

This paper examines the role the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (umca) played in the move towards independence in Tanganyika. It sees a paradox at the heart of the Society’s work and mission in its apparent affirmation of African experience but its seeming failure to promote African leaders...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Mission studies
Authors: Mndolwa, Maimbo W.; King, Fergus J.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: 2016
In:Mission studies
Year: 2016, Volume: 33, Issue: 3, Pages: 327-351
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Tanganjika / Tanzania / Anglican Church / Universities' Mission to Central Africa / History 1961-1995
Further subjects:B Universities’ Mission to Central Africa Frank Weston Vincent Lucas ujamaa Anglican Tanganyika
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:This paper examines the role the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (umca) played in the move towards independence in Tanganyika. It sees a paradox at the heart of the Society’s work and mission in its apparent affirmation of African experience but its seeming failure to promote African leadership. However, the lack of ecclesiastical preferment, due in part to circumstances beyond the control of the Society, could not quench its support for the value of African experience. Indeed, Christians formed in the umca tradition would go on to take key roles in government before and after independence, and eventually help to build a national church, the Church of the Province of Tanganyika (now the Anglican Church of Tanzania), which would embrace the African philosophy of Ujamaa (Unity) over narrow Anglo-Catholicism.
ISSN:1573-3831
Contains:In: Mission studies
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/15733831-12341466