The Significance of Evitability in Nature

Assessing the current situation of the religion-science dialogue, it seems that a consensus of nonconsensus has been reached. This nonconsensus provides a pluralistic context for the religion and science dialogue, and one area where this plurality is clear is the discourse on relational models of Go...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Zygon
Main Author: Keogh, Gary
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2015]
In:Zygon
Year: 2015, Volume: 50, Issue: 3, Pages: 671-691
Further subjects:B Nature
B Determinism
B Creation
B Causality
B Freedom
Online Access: doi
Description
Summary:Assessing the current situation of the religion-science dialogue, it seems that a consensus of nonconsensus has been reached. This nonconsensus provides a pluralistic context for the religion and science dialogue, and one area where this plurality is clear is the discourse on relational models of God and creation. A number of interesting models have gained attention in contemporary theological dialogue with science, yet there is an overriding theme: an emphasis on God's involvement with the world. In this article, I argue that theology has been preoccupied with this emphasis. It is suggested that the theme of the freedom of nature has been underrepresented. This theme of the freedom of nature I argue carries important theological implications. It is suggested that acts or events gain their significance largely by way of being contextualized by the fact that such acts or events could have been otherwise, a realization that might provide the various relational models of God and the world food for thought.
ISSN:1467-9744
Contains:Enthalten in: Zygon
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12190