Eliot’s rose garden: Some phenomenology and theology in “Burnt Norton”

T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets respond to and gradually modify the experience that is evoked in the first part of “Burnt Norton”. Yet the well-known rose garden scene has been variously interpreted, the “presences” being either naturalized or regarded as supernatural entities. A phenomenological r...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Christianity & literature
Main Author: Hart, Kevin
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2015]
In:Christianity & literature
Year: 2015, Volume: 64, Issue: 3, Pages: 243-265
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets respond to and gradually modify the experience that is evoked in the first part of “Burnt Norton”. Yet the well-known rose garden scene has been variously interpreted, the “presences” being either naturalized or regarded as supernatural entities. A phenomenological reading of the rose garden scene gives us a more secure, and also a more nuanced, understanding of what happens in the rose garden, and therefore allows us to develop a fuller and more reliable reading of Four Quartets.
ISSN:2056-5666
Contains:Enthalten in: Christianity & literature
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1177/0148333115577900