What the Community Religion Project can tell us about the study of religious diversity in the UK

The Community Religions Project at the University of Leeds ( http://arts.leeds.ac.uk/crp/ ) has been in existence for over 35 years and provides a unique model for observing development in the way religious diversity and pluralism have been conceptualised and studied in the UK. Many leading scholars...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Diskus
Main Author: Prideaux, Melanie
Contributors: Merrygold, Jo (Other)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2014]
In:Diskus
Year: 2014, Volume: 16, Issue: 3, Pages: 34-46
Online Access: Volltext (Kostenfrei)
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Summary:The Community Religions Project at the University of Leeds ( http://arts.leeds.ac.uk/crp/ ) has been in existence for over 35 years and provides a unique model for observing development in the way religious diversity and pluralism have been conceptualised and studied in the UK. Many leading scholars of religion in the UK have produced monographs, research papers, or other work in conjunction with the CRP. The increasing engagement with concepts and challenges of religious diversity and pluralism are visible in the greater emphasis on interreligious relations, and religion(s) or ‘faith’ and the state; largely through sociological and policy studies, rather than ethnographic studies of discrete religious communities. Issues concerning religious categories and conflation of religious with national or ethnic identity are notable in early CRP studies, but are now more clearly articulated as a focus for study. The continuing focus on qualitative methods is revealing of prevailing UK models of study of religions, though the move from micro (very local) to macro (UK-wide) studies involves increasing use of secondary and quantitative date. Using the archive of the CRP, this paper will provide an intellectual history of study of religions in the UK which highlights the changing engagement with pluralism and diversity. Using example studies, issues concerning terminology, method and theory will be identified. The move to a focus on interreligious studies and religion and policy will also provide a framework for considering how study of religions in the UK is articulated in response to both academic and non-academic interests and concerns.
ISSN:0967-8948
Contains:Enthalten in: Diskus
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.18792/diskus.v16i3.53