The enduring significance of Christos Yannaras: some further works in translation

The Greek philosopher and theologian Christos Yannaras is becoming better known in the English-speaking world with the publication of an increasing number of his works in English translation. With the help of Wittgenstein and Heidegger, Yannaras articulates an ontological (as opposed to an ontic) ve...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:International journal for the study of the Christian church
Main Author: Russell, Norman 1945-
Format: Electronic/Print Review
Language:English
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Published: [2016]
In:International journal for the study of the Christian church
Year: 2016, Volume: 16, Issue: 1, Pages: 58-65
Review of:Relational ontology (Russell, Norman)
The meaning of reality (Russell, Norman)
The enigma of evil (Russell, Norman)
Against religion (Brookline, Massachusetts : Holy Cross Orthodox Press, 2013) (Russell, Norman)
The schism in philosophy (Russell, Norman)
Further subjects:B Book review
Online Access: doi
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Summary:The Greek philosopher and theologian Christos Yannaras is becoming better known in the English-speaking world with the publication of an increasing number of his works in English translation. With the help of Wittgenstein and Heidegger, Yannaras articulates an ontological (as opposed to an ontic) version of Being based on relation. Beings exist not as ontic entities but only with reference to the person. Relation actually constitutes existents. Our fulfilment as human beings lies in our ascending from the mode of nature, which is bound by necessity, to a mode of existence characterised by self-transcending referentiality or love. Two obstacles are considered: the problem of evil and the ‘religionisation’ of Christianity. The fundamental problem of evil is that it renders human life without meaning. There are, however, no rational explanations of evil. The only reply lies beyond language, in faith/trust, self-transcendence and self-offering. A religionised version of Christianity transforms faith into an ideology which holds out salvation as a reward for the individual. The Church - the ecclesial event - is not a collection of individuals seeking their own salvation but a community of people called to struggle together to attain true existence, to pass from the finite mode of nature to that mode which knows no limitations of decay and death. An intellectualist approach to philosophy does not help us to achieve this goal. For philosophy is not simply an exercise in thinking but the struggle to attain existential freedom. Such freedom is transformatory, referential and ek-static.
ISSN:1474-225X
Contains:Enthalten in: International journal for the study of the Christian church
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/1474225X.2016.1152448