Interiorizing Islam: Religious Experience and State Oversight in the Islamic Republic of Iran

Recent work in religious studies has turned from a long-standing focus on interior expressions of religion to emphasize instead embodied worship and the materiality of religious expression. Yet, for all the worthwhile critique of experience as a theoretical category, in practice various communities...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of the American Academy of Religion
Main Author: Foody, Kathleen
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2015]
In:Journal of the American Academy of Religion
Year: 2015, Volume: 83, Issue: 3, Pages: 599-623
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:Recent work in religious studies has turned from a long-standing focus on interior expressions of religion to emphasize instead embodied worship and the materiality of religious expression. Yet, for all the worthwhile critique of experience as a theoretical category, in practice various communities have taken up the language of experience as a central term for their own traditions. Scholars of religion have traced the cross-pollination of modern Hindu and Buddhist traditions with the language of “experience”; however, this question has received little attention in the study of Islam. This article addresses that lacuna. Muslim writings on Islam, specifically within the Islamic Republic of Iran, demonstrate a clear engagement with “religious experience.” The Muslim writers discussed here, major figures of the Iranian reformist movement of the 1990s and 2000s, attempt to craft an arena of religiosity untouchable by state law and the Islamic Republic's governance of religious action.
ISSN:1477-4585
Contains:Enthalten in: American Academy of Religion, Journal of the American Academy of Religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1093/jaarel/lfv029