Reading the Bible in the light of Muslim sources: from isrāʾīliyyāt to islāmiyyāt

In a restricted sense, the term isrāʾīliyyāt applies to the traditions and reports that contain elements of the legendary and religious literature of Jews and Christians, but more inclusively and more commonly it also refers to Zoroastrian and other Near Eastern elements, including folklore. In othe...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Islam and Christian-Muslim relations
Main Author: Albayrak, İsmail 1968-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Taylor & Francis [2012]
In: Islam and Christian-Muslim relations
RelBib Classification:BJ Islam
CC Christianity and Non-Christian religion; Inter-religious relations
HA Bible
Further subjects:B islāmiyyāt
B Bible
B Qur'an
B Exegesis
B Isrāʾīliyyāt
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:In a restricted sense, the term isrāʾīliyyāt applies to the traditions and reports that contain elements of the legendary and religious literature of Jews and Christians, but more inclusively and more commonly it also refers to Zoroastrian and other Near Eastern elements, including folklore. In other words, all foreign (non-Islamic) elements used to interpret the Qur'an are called isrāʾīliyyāt. Muslims have used biblical and other sources in their interpretation of the Qur'an (and sometimes still do). This article will deal with questions such as how non-Islamic materials have been utilized in Islamic sources - and whether it is possible to use the Qur'an and other Islamic sources equally in the exegesis of the Bible. In other words, is it possible to develop a notion of islāmiyyāt, similar to the notion of isrāʾīliyyāt? In what ways can the usage of Islamic sources in the exegesis of the Bible contribute to Muslim-Christian and Muslim-Jewish dialogue?
ISSN:1469-9311
Contains:Enthalten in: Islam and Christian-Muslim relations
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/09596410.2012.655062