Anti-Theism and the Problem of Divine Hiddenness

While most discussions in natural theology focus on the existence and nature of God, recently the axiological implications of theism have been taken up by such authors as Kahane (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82: 674-696, 2011), Kraay and Dragos (Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43: 157-178...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Sophia
Main Author: Dumsday, Travis
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Netherlands [2016]
In: Sophia
Year: 2016, Volume: 55, Issue: 2, Pages: 179-195
IxTheo Classification:AB Philosophy of religion; criticism of religion; atheism
NBC Doctrine of God
Further subjects:B Theism
B Atheism
B Theodicy
B Hiddenness
B Natural Theology
B God
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:While most discussions in natural theology focus on the existence and nature of God, recently the axiological implications of theism have been taken up by such authors as Kahane (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82: 674-696, 2011), Kraay and Dragos (Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43: 157-178, 2013), Davis (Faith & Philosophy 31: 143-159, 2014), McLean (Sophia 54: 13-24, 2015), Penner and Lougheed (Faith and Philosophy, 2015), and Penner (Faith and Philosophy 32: 325-337, 2015). Rather than asking whether God exists, they ask whether God’s existence would be a good thing or a bad thing. That general question breaks down into more precise sub-questions, with a wide variety of possible positions resulting. Here, I argue that one of these positions (theistic narrow personal anti-theism) is possibly true, and that this possibility provides for a new defence against one of the most prominent arguments for atheism in the current literature: the problem of divine hiddenness.
ISSN:1873-930X
Contains:Enthalten in: Sophia
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s11841-015-0493-x