Divine Immutability for Henotheists

Discussions of divine immutability normally take place against the backdrop of a presupposition of monotheism. This background makes some problems seem especially salient—for instance, does the notion that God is immutable have any implications for God’s relation to time? In what follows, I’ll consi...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Sophia
Main Author: Baltzly, Dirk 1963-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Netherlands [2016]
In: Sophia
Year: 2016, Volume: 55, Issue: 2, Pages: 129-143
RelBib Classification:AB Philosophy of religion; criticism of religion; atheism
BE Greco-Roman religions
NBC Doctrine of God
TB Antiquity
VA Philosophy
Further subjects:B Platonism
B Henotheism
B Ancient Philosophy
B Divine Attributes
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:Discussions of divine immutability normally take place against the backdrop of a presupposition of monotheism. This background makes some problems seem especially salient—for instance, does the notion that God is immutable have any implications for God’s relation to time? In what follows, I’ll consider the problem of divine immutability in the context of henotheistic conceptions of god. I take henotheism to be the view that, although there are a plurality of gods, all of them are in some sense dependent upon and subordinate to one god that is the supreme first principle or archê. Henoetheism was the dominant approach to gods among the pagan philosophers of antiquity—with a few exceptions. I consider the development of henotheistic defences of divine immutability through a dialectical development from Xenophanes to Plato to Proclus (d. 485 CE).
ISSN:1873-930X
Contains:Enthalten in: Sophia
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s11841-015-0472-2