What’s God Got to Do with It? How Religiosity Predicts Atheists’ Health

The relationship between atheism and health is poorly understood within the Religion/Spirituality-health literature. While the extant literature promotes the idea that Attendance, Prayer, and Religiosity are connected to positive health outcomes, these relationships have not been established when co...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Main Author: Speed, David
Contributors: Fowler, Ken (Other)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Science + Business Media B. V. [2016]
In: Journal of religion and health
Year: 2016, Volume: 55, Issue: 1, Pages: 296-308
RelBib Classification:AB Philosophy of religion; criticism of religion; atheism
NCH Medical ethics
Further subjects:B Atheism
B Health
B General Social Survey
B Homoscedasticity
B Statistical moderation
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Description
Summary:The relationship between atheism and health is poorly understood within the Religion/Spirituality-health literature. While the extant literature promotes the idea that Attendance, Prayer, and Religiosity are connected to positive health outcomes, these relationships have not been established when controlling for whether a person is an atheist. Data from the 2008-2012 American General Social Survey (n = 3210) were used to investigate this relationship. Results indicated that atheists experienced Religiosity more negatively than non-atheists. Additionally, results demonstrated that non-belief in God was not related to better or worse perceived global health, suggesting that belief in God is not inherently linked to better reported health.
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-015-0083-9