The Future of Reformation Studies

Recent scholarly trends have called into question the view of the Reformation as a singular, epoch-making event; many scholars prefer to speak of sixteenth-century “reformations,” while others regard the Reformation as a chapter within longer-running and more significant historical processes. This e...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Church history and religious culture
Main Author: Evener, Vincent
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Brill 2017
In: Church history and religious culture
Year: 2017, Volume: 97, Issue: 3/4, Pages: 310-321
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Reformation / Specificity / Complexity / Church history studies
IxTheo Classification:KAA Church history
KAG Church history 1500-1648; Reformation; humanism; Renaissance
Further subjects:B Reformation church history history of Christianity
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:Recent scholarly trends have called into question the view of the Reformation as a singular, epoch-making event; many scholars prefer to speak of sixteenth-century “reformations,” while others regard the Reformation as a chapter within longer-running and more significant historical processes. This essay proposes viewing the Reformation as a complex, epoch-making event that was initiated and sustained by both Protestant and Catholic actors. The Reformation created an enduring reality of division that was experienced and engaged differently by Christians depending upon their ecclesial, social, and geographic location, among other factors. By relating the disciplinary motives and endeavors of the era to contestation regarding truth and falsehood, the divine and the demonic, this essay argues for taking a broader view of religious discipline and for seeking to understand the Reformation era on its own terms, rather than as a late-medieval or an early-modern event.
ISSN:1871-2428
Contains:In: Church history and religious culture
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/18712428-09703002