The Problem of God's Existence

There are four main positions in the argument about whether God exists: atheism (God does not exist), theism (God exists), agnosticism (it is impossible to know whether God exists or not), and scepticism (at the moment we do not know whether God exists or not). From an epistemological standpoint, sc...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:European journal for philosophy of religion
Main Author: Ziemiński, Ireneusz
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Published: University of Innsbruck in cooperation with the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Birmingham [2015]
In: European journal for philosophy of religion
Year: 2015, Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Pages: 143-163
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Existence of God / Theism / Atheism / Agnosticism / Scepticism
IxTheo Classification:AB Philosophy of religion; criticism of religion; atheism
Online Access: Volltext (teilw. kostenfrei)
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Summary:There are four main positions in the argument about whether God exists: atheism (God does not exist), theism (God exists), agnosticism (it is impossible to know whether God exists or not), and scepticism (at the moment we do not know whether God exists or not). From an epistemological standpoint, scepticism is the most rational; even if a decisive argument which would settle the debate has not been discovered yet, one cannot exclude the possibility of finding it eventually. Agnosticism is too radical (and even incoherent), but theism and atheism exceed the available data. However, from a practical standpoint, choosing theism or atheism seems to be more rational than scepticism (not to mention agnosticism); one of them is bound to be right, because there are only two possibilities, one of which has to be true: either God exists or not.
Contains:Enthalten in: European journal for philosophy of religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.24204/ejpr.v7i1.135