Dancing at Both Weddings

A new feminist movement is on the rise in Israel. It is led by haredi (ultra-Orthodox) women, usually known for their silent acquiescence to the rabbinate. They are not looking to create a revolution, but their activism may have implications not only for women, but for Israel in general. Based on in...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of law, religion and state
Main Author: Feldman, Jan
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: 2018
In:Journal of law, religion and state
Year: 2018, Volume: 6, Issue: 1, Pages: 68-113
Further subjects:B Women politics haredi religion
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:A new feminist movement is on the rise in Israel. It is led by haredi (ultra-Orthodox) women, usually known for their silent acquiescence to the rabbinate. They are not looking to create a revolution, but their activism may have implications not only for women, but for Israel in general. Based on interviews with haredi activists, Knesset (Parliament) members, secular and religious women heads of ngos, and academics, we contend that political activism, especially for haredi women with little education, experience, and resources, is not ironic, but rather, an appropriate vehicle for advancing their agenda. Other avenues of activity are closed for haredi women. Politics, which is assimilated into the category of “secular” activities, is likely to generate less opposition from their community. Haredi women and the state of Israel are trying to dance at two different weddings: at one, the tune being played is that of women’s rights and democracy; at the other, it is Jewish law, with its religious patriarchy.
ISSN:2212-4810
Contains:In: Journal of law, religion and state
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/22124810-00601004