Trust, organisational boundaries and gender: Mothers Prayers in Ukraine

This article is focused on the Ukrainian branch of an international prayer network Mothers Prayers and its relations with the hierarchy of the Greek Catholic Church. The argument made here can be located within investigations on the transformations of religion and gender relations under Soviet socia...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Religion, state & society
Main Author: Halemba, Agnieszka 1970-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Routledge [2018]
In: Religion, state & society
Year: 2018, Volume: 46, Issue: 1, Pages: 64-78
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Mothers Prayers / Ukrainische Katholische Kirche
Further subjects:B Ukraine
B Religion
B Greek Catholic Church
B Secularisation
B Gender
B Soviet
B prayer movements
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:This article is focused on the Ukrainian branch of an international prayer network Mothers Prayers and its relations with the hierarchy of the Greek Catholic Church. The argument made here can be located within investigations on the transformations of religion and gender relations under Soviet socialism and the post-Soviet conditions (Buckley 1997; Kormina et al. 2015; Luehrmann 2011; Ngo and Quijada 2015; Wanner 2012). While a gender-focused analysis can undoubtedly help us understand some crucial aspects of this movement's development, here I put forward a complementary interpretation which stresses the need to understand religious vitality and the role of religion, including religious organisations such as churches, in social and political struggles as an outcome of the Soviet secularisation project. The secularisation politics in the Soviet Union resulted both in the appearance of an ‘ambient faith' (Engelke 2012; Wanner 2014) in unexpected areas of life and in changes of how people perceive the role of religious organisations in religious and political life. I argue that the praying mothers mobilise their motherhood to challenge the male-dominated hierarchical religious organisation in ways that are implicit and indirect, but nevertheless significant.
ISSN:1465-3974
Contains:Enthalten in: Religion, state & society
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/09637494.2018.1430411