Religious education and religious choice

According to the "religious choice case" for compulsory religious education, pupils have a right to be made aware of the religious and irreligious paths open to them and equipped with the wherewithal to choose between them. A familiar objection to this argument is that the idea of religiou...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of beliefs and values
Main Author: Hand, Michael
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2015]
In:Journal of beliefs and values
Year: 2015, Volume: 36, Issue: 1, Pages: 31-39
Further subjects:B Personal autonomy
B religious choice
B doxastic voluntarism
B Religious Education
B Religious Belief
B leap of faith
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:According to the "religious choice case" for compulsory religious education, pupils have a right to be made aware of the religious and irreligious paths open to them and equipped with the wherewithal to choose between them. A familiar objection to this argument is that the idea of religious choice reduces religion to a matter of taste. I argue, first, that this familiar objection fails and, second, that we nevertheless have good reason to reject the religious choice case. Religious and irreligious views have a core cognitive dimension that makes it inappropriate to talk of choosing between them. What I have elsewhere called the "possibility-of-truth case" remains the strongest justification for compulsory religious education.
ISSN:1469-9362
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of beliefs and values
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/13617672.2015.1013817