Exploring the Impact of Religious Beliefs, Leadership, and Networks on Response and Recovery of Disaster-affected Populations: A Case Study from Indonesia

Although religion often comprises a central component of the social and cultural make-up of communities in developing countries affected by disasters, there is often limited understanding of how religious faith, religious leaders, and religious institutions contribute to vulnerability and resilience...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of contemporary religion
Main Author: Joakim, Erin P.
Contributors: White, Robert S. 1948- (Other)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Carfax Publ. [2015]
[publisher not identified]
In: Journal of contemporary religion
Year: 2015, Volume: 30, Issue: 2, Pages: 193-212
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Katastrophenreaktion / Coping / Religiosity
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:Although religion often comprises a central component of the social and cultural make-up of communities in developing countries affected by disasters, there is often limited understanding of how religious faith, religious leaders, and religious institutions contribute to vulnerability and resilience in the post-disaster period. Using a case study related to the earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2006, our research examined the role of faith and religion from the perspective of affected populations, including individuals, religious leaders, and academics. The research suggests complexity in fatalistic thinking and the role of religious activities, where both vulnerability and resilience co-existed. The nature of religious leadership was found to be highly dependent on the individual, although leaders primarily saw their roles as supporting the psychological recovery of the affected population. Examining religious institutions suggests that physical structures, collective engagement in activities, networks, and theological perspectives provided opportunities for initiatives aiming at disaster risk reduction, although not all of these aspects remain functional in the aftermath of disasters. The article concludes by discussing the importance of incorporating religious faith and institutions in disaster risk reduction programming and unifying messages between faith and non-faith organizations.
ISSN:1469-9419
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of contemporary religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/13537903.2015.1025538