Locating religion in victory-making: the 1973 war discourse in Egypt

Most of the literature on the Arab-Israeli war in 1973 takes material gains and military advances as measurements that indicate victory or defeat. Accordingly, based on the magnitude of weaponry used and the associated tactics employed, scholarly works declare Egypt or Israel the winner. This articl...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of contemporary religion
Main Author: Menshawy, Mustafa
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Published: Carfax Publ. [2018]
In: Journal of contemporary religion
Year: 2018, Volume: 33, Issue: 1, Pages: 39-52
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Egypt / Yom Kippur War / Discourse / Religion
IxTheo Classification:AD Sociology of religion; religious policy
KBL Near East and North Africa
ZC Politics in general
Further subjects:B Discourse
B Egypt
B Religion
B Yom Kippur War
B the 1973 war
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
Description
Summary:Most of the literature on the Arab-Israeli war in 1973 takes material gains and military advances as measurements that indicate victory or defeat. Accordingly, based on the magnitude of weaponry used and the associated tactics employed, scholarly works declare Egypt or Israel the winner. This article moves away from such ‘materialistic' accounts of the war's conclusion by exploring a similarly significant victory-maker: the use of the discourse of religion. By looking at previously untapped official and semi-official texts from the war's onset through the eight years of President Anwar Sadat's rule, the article finds this discourse to be composed of three thematic structures. These structures cohere into patterns that facilitated an account of the war as a massive and unquestionable Egyptian ‘victory'. The study also addresses how the interplay of language and religion was so closely attuned to the broader context that included the use of authoritarianism in politics and in the media as well as a so-called Islamic revival. Rather than supposing that the religious references in this discourse may have been in some way truthful, I show that it relied on a set of intentional falsehoods.
ISSN:1469-9419
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of contemporary religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/13537903.2018.1408276