Thomas Merton: Casting Out the Noonday Demon

Thomas Merton, perhaps even because of his experience of the Zen Buddhist conventions, was aware of the problematic nature of anger and the feeling of dejection in the the face of the tension that grief strikes with its nemesis, timidity. He claims that both Christianity and Buddhism agree that the...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Studies in spirituality
Main Author: Zammit, Michael
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2017]
In:Studies in spirituality
Year: 2017, Volume: 27, Pages: 281-293
Online Access: Volltext (Verlag)
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Summary:Thomas Merton, perhaps even because of his experience of the Zen Buddhist conventions, was aware of the problematic nature of anger and the feeling of dejection in the the face of the tension that grief strikes with its nemesis, timidity. He claims that both Christianity and Buddhism agree that the root of man's problem is that his consciousness is all fouled up. This paper therefore is concerned with why one does not apprehend reality as it fully and truthfully is, in the light of Merton and his interest even in Sanskrit and the views it captures.
ISSN:0926-6453
Contains:Enthalten in: Studies in spirituality
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.2143/SIS.27.0.3254107