The sacrificial economy: assessors, contractors, and thieves in the management of sacrificial sheep at the Eanna Temple of Uruk (ca. 625-520 B.C.)

"In the mid-first millennium B.C., the Eanna temple at Uruk sacrificed a minimum of nine lambs every day in its basic routine of offerings to its gods; in addition to these, special occasions and festivals demanded the sacrifice of as many as 90 lambs in a single day. All told, the Eanna sacrif...

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Bibliographic Details
Contributors: Kozuh, Michael (Other)
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
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Published: Winona Lake, Indiana Eisenbrauns 2014
Reviews:[Rezension von: Michael Kozuh, The sacrificial economy. Assessors, contractors, and thieves in the management of sacrificial sheep at the Eanna temple of Uruk (ca. 625–520 B. C.)] (2016) (Tamerus, Mark)
Series/Journal:Explorations in ancient Near Eastern civilizations 2
Further subjects:B Animal culture
B Temples Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Iraq ; Erech (Extinct city)
B Goats
B Buildings
B Animal culture Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Erech (Extinct city) Religious life and customs
B HISTORY ; Civilization
B Erech (Extinct city) Economic conditions
B Sheep Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Goats Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Herders Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Economic history
B Animal sacrifice Economic aspects Iraq Erech (Extinct city)
B Erech (Extinct city) Buildings, structures, etc
B Herders
B Sheep
B Electronic books
B Temples
Online Access: Lizenzpflichtig
Description
Summary:"In the mid-first millennium B.C., the Eanna temple at Uruk sacrificed a minimum of nine lambs every day in its basic routine of offerings to its gods; in addition to these, special occasions and festivals demanded the sacrifice of as many as 90 lambs in a single day. All told, the Eanna sacrificed about 4,300 lambs per year. There were more than 120 herdsmen connected to the Eanna at any given time, and the temple expected there to be tens of thousands of sheep and goats under their responsibility. These herdsmen delivered male lambs to the Eanna for sacrifice, and the temple had an internal infrastructure for the care, maintenance, and ritual expenditure of these lambs; they also delivered wool, which the Eanna sold mostly in bulk quantities. This book aims to analyze the economic organization of this entire system of sheep and goat maintenance and utilization, to explore the economic and social relationships between the Eanna and its herdsmen, and to integrate the study of the Eanna's animal economy into the developing picture of the Neo-Babylonian temple economy as a whole"--Provided by publisher
Item Description:Includes bibliographical references and index. - Print version record
ISBN:1575068923