"White Crisis" and/as "Existential Risk," or the Entangled Apocalypticism of Artificial Intelligence

In this article, I present a critique of Robert Geraci's Apocalyptic artificial intelligence (AI) discourse, drawing attention to certain shortcomings which become apparent when the analytical lens shifts from religion to the race-religion nexus. Building on earlier work, I explore the phenomen...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Zygon
Main Author: Ali, Mustafa, Syed
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Wiley-Blackwell [2019]
In:Zygon
Year: 2019, Volume: 54, Issue: 1, Pages: 207-224
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Artificial intelligence / Human being / Threat / Whites / Apocalypticism
Further subjects:B existential risk
B Transhumanism
B Apocalyptic AI
B Apocalypticism
B race
B Religion
B algorithmic racism
B Posthumanism
B White Crisis
B Whiteness
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:In this article, I present a critique of Robert Geraci's Apocalyptic artificial intelligence (AI) discourse, drawing attention to certain shortcomings which become apparent when the analytical lens shifts from religion to the race-religion nexus. Building on earlier work, I explore the phenomenon of existential risk associated with Apocalyptic AI in relation to "White Crisis," a modern racial phenomenon with premodern religious origins. Adopting a critical race theoretical and decolonial perspective, I argue that all three phenomena are entangled and they should be understood as a strategy, albeit perhaps merely rhetorical, for maintaining white hegemony under nonwhite contestation. I further suggest that this claim can be shown to be supported by the disclosure of continuity through change in the long-durée entanglement of race and religion associated with the establishment, maintenance, expansion, and refinement of the modern/colonial world system if and when such phenomena are understood as iterative shifts in a programmatic trajectory of domination which might usefully be framed as "algorithmic racism."
ISSN:1467-9744
Contains:Enthalten in: Zygon
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1111/zygo.12498