Religion Affiliation and Depression Risk: Factory Workers Working in Hi-Tech Companies in Shanghai, China

This study examines factors contributing to depression among migrant factory workers in Shanghai. A survey was designed with mental health questions under a framework explaining: (1) social capital, (2) migratory stress, and (3) mental health consequences. With a return rate of 98.3%, 1966 individua...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Authors: Hou, Liwen; Cheung, Monit; Leung, Patrick; Xu, Yongxiang
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Science + Business Media B. V. [2019]
In:Journal of religion and health
Year: 2019, Volume: 58, Issue: 2, Pages: 490-505
Further subjects:B Chinese factory workers
B Religious support
B Depressive symptoms
B HSCL-25
B Trust and conflict
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Description
Summary:This study examines factors contributing to depression among migrant factory workers in Shanghai. A survey was designed with mental health questions under a framework explaining: (1) social capital, (2) migratory stress, and (3) mental health consequences. With a return rate of 98.3%, 1966 individuals completed the survey. Only 11.1% of the respondents indicated having a religious affiliation. The findings are not surprising about the relationship between trust, economic condition, and depression. However, it is surprising to find that not having a religious affiliation is significantly connected to better mental health. The effect of religious beliefs should be examined as a trust factor to remove the barrier of perceiving religion as an added stressor.
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-019-00790-1