Love is a Malady: Remnants of a Lost Arabic Work on Medical Deontology

This article offers, in edition and translation, nine fragments from an otherwise lost Arabic compendium on doctoral responsibilities, titled Mā lā yasa'u t-tabība gahluhū 'What the Physician is not Allowed to Ignore'; the work was composed by a certain Ibn as-Sarī, presumably in the...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of Semitic studies
Main Author: Kahl, Oliver
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Oxford University Press [2019]
In:Journal of Semitic studies
Year: 2019, Volume: 64, Issue: 1, Pages: 185-198
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
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Summary:This article offers, in edition and translation, nine fragments from an otherwise lost Arabic compendium on doctoral responsibilities, titled Mā lā yasa'u t-tabība gahluhū 'What the Physician is not Allowed to Ignore'; the work was composed by a certain Ibn as-Sarī, presumably in the early decades of the eleventh century ce in northern Iraq. The extant fragments were selected by the Nestorian doctor 'Ubaid Allāh Ibn Bu?tīsū' (d. c. 1060 ce), and thus transmitted as an appendix to his famous epistle on psychosomatic medicine; they centre, like the latter, around the themes of passionate love, afflictions of the soul and the interplay between psychical and physical disorders. Framed by a short prologue and epilogue from the hand of 'Ubaid Allāh, the fragments consist of partially elaborated quotations ascribed to Greek, Byzantine and Arab philosophers, physicians and astrologers. The epistemological value of these fragments lies in highlighting the struggle of some farsighted medieval Arab scholars to define and establish psychology as a medical discipline.
ISSN:1477-8556
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of Semitic studies
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1093/jss/fgy038