Mis-Education, A Recurring Theme? Transforming Black Religious and Theological Education

Educating ministers and religious educators with the skills to connect with a variety of congregations and communities is a difficult task. Looking specifically at theological and religious education with African Americans, there are historical criticisms of mis-education. Mis-education defined by C...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Religious education
Main Author: Wright, Almeda M.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group [2017]
In:Religious education
Year: 2017, Volume: 112, Issue: 1, Pages: 66-79
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Description
Summary:Educating ministers and religious educators with the skills to connect with a variety of congregations and communities is a difficult task. Looking specifically at theological and religious education with African Americans, there are historical criticisms of mis-education. Mis-education defined by Carter G. Woodson describes a process of educating that becomes more of a liability than asset by devaluing the religion and traditions of the masses of African Americans. This article reviews education resources (sermons and Sunday school literature) in African American churches along with the perspectives of seminary students to explore if Woodson's claims of mis-education persist.
ISSN:1547-3201
Contains:Enthalten in: Religious education
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1080/00344087.2016.1247327