Railroading religion: Mormons, tourists, and the corporate spirit of the West

"Walker tracks how 'knowledge' about Mormon life was generated among settlers, railroad agents, travelers, boosters, and bureaucrats from Sacramento to Salt Lake to Washington D.C. and stops between. How ordinary Americans articulated and advanced their own theories about Mormondom, W...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Walker, David 1979-
Format: Print Book
Language:English
Subito Delivery Service: Order now.
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Book acquisition:
Drawer...
Published: Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Press [2019]
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B USA / Mormonen / Railroad construction / Tourism / History 1800-1900
Further subjects:B Railroads (West (U.S.)) History 19th century
B Corinne (Utah) History 19th century
B Mormon Church Public opinion History 19th century
B Mormon Church History 19th century
B Tourism (United States) History 19th century
Online Access: Table of Contents
Blurb
Parallel Edition:Electronic
Description
Summary:"Walker tracks how 'knowledge' about Mormon life was generated among settlers, railroad agents, travelers, boosters, and bureaucrats from Sacramento to Salt Lake to Washington D.C. and stops between. How ordinary Americans articulated and advanced their own theories about Mormondom, Walker argues, accomplished nothing less than the rise of religion as a category of both the popular and scholarly imagination. As it happened, the burgeoning of railroad-related alliances and businesses stimulated LDS Church officials to mobilize in ways that ironically yielded increasingly dynamic and expansive religious institutions. Rather than eradicating or diminishing Mormonism western railroads and their boosters helped to establish it as a normative American religion"--
Item Description:Includes bibliographical references and index
ISBN:1469653192