The shaman's wages: trading in ritual on Cheju Island

A neo-Confucian reformer's 1702 purge -- Cultural politics of Cheju shamanism in the twentieth century -- The art of ritual exchange -- Skillful performer or avaricious animator? -- A Kut as heritage goods with the UNESCO brand.

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Yun, Kyoim
Format: Print Book
Language:English
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Published: Seattle University of Washington Press [2019]
Series/Journal:Korean studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Jeju / Shamanism / Ritual / Economic anthropology / History / Jeju-do / Shamanism / Kut
Further subjects:B Shamanism (Korea (South)) (Cheju Island)
B Economic anthropology (Korea (South)) (Cheju Island)
B Shamanism Rituals
B Cheju Island (Korea) Religious life and customs
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Summary:A neo-Confucian reformer's 1702 purge -- Cultural politics of Cheju shamanism in the twentieth century -- The art of ritual exchange -- Skillful performer or avaricious animator? -- A Kut as heritage goods with the UNESCO brand.
"Most studies of Korean shamanism--a popular religion that is both celebrated and stigmatized--have minimized regional differences, focusing on shamans from central Korea whose work involves spirit possession. Less attention has been paid to hereditary shamans, a number of whom have resided for centuries on Cheju Island, off Korea's southwest coast. Although simbang (native Cheju shamans) are relied upon to perform important rituals, for which they receive lavish offerings, they are often perceived as charlatans who swindle innocent people. This first study of the material exchange and politics of Korean shamanism describes interactions between shamans and their clients in order to show how this ritual exchange is distinct from other forms of transaction, such as barter, purchase, bribery, and gift-giving. The "ritual economy" of Korean simbang involves not only monetary payment, but also reciprocity, sincerity, and the expressive forms that practitioners use to authenticate ritual actions that both emphasize ritual exchange and distinguish it from other forms social and economic transactions"--
Item Description:Includes bibliographical references and index
ISBN:0295745959