Instrumentalist Interpretations of Hindu Environmental Ethics

Many environmental ethicists believe that any adequate environmental ethic should attribute 'direct moral standing' (often glossed in terms of intrinsic value) to plants, animals, and the rest of nature. But certain interpretations of Hindu environmental ethics apparently attribute only in...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Sophia
Main Author: Perrett, Roy W.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2018]
In:Sophia
Year: 2018, Volume: 57, Issue: 4, Pages: 661-668
Further subjects:B instrumental value
B Environmental Ethics
B Hindu ethics
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Description
Summary:Many environmental ethicists believe that any adequate environmental ethic should attribute 'direct moral standing' (often glossed in terms of intrinsic value) to plants, animals, and the rest of nature. But certain interpretations of Hindu environmental ethics apparently attribute only instrumental value to nature. This places them in direct conflict with the purported adequacy condition on an environmental ethic. So, is such a Hindu ethical view really inadequate? In his recent book Hinduism and Environmental Ethics, Christopher Framarin claims that it is because Hindu instrumentalism about nature is either viciously circular or unacceptably arbitrary. I argue, however, that Framarin's claim founders in virtue of his misconstruing the logical structure of instrumental value.
ISSN:1873-930X
Contains:Enthalten in: Sophia
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s11841-016-0533-1