The Pew Versus the Couch: Relationship Between Mental Health and Faith Communities and Lessons Learned from a VA/Clergy Partnership Project

The history of the relationship between religion and mental health is one of commonality, conflict, controversy, and distrust. An awareness of this complex relationship is essential to clinicians and clergy seeking to holistically meet the needs of people in our clinics, our churches, and our commun...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Authors: Sullivan, Steve; Cheney, Ann M.; Haynes, Tiffany F.; Hunt, Justin; Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Greer
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2014]
In:Journal of religion and health
Year: 2014, Volume: 53, Issue: 4, Pages: 1267-1282
Further subjects:B Pastoral care
B Spirituality
B Religion
B Mental Health
B Veteran
B Clergy
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Description
Summary:The history of the relationship between religion and mental health is one of commonality, conflict, controversy, and distrust. An awareness of this complex relationship is essential to clinicians and clergy seeking to holistically meet the needs of people in our clinics, our churches, and our communities. Understanding this relationship may be particularly important in rural communities. This paper briefly discusses the history of this relationship and important areas of disagreement and contention. The paper moves beyond theory to present some current practical tensions identified in a brief case study of VA/Clergy partnerships in rural Arkansas. The paper concludes with a framework of three models for understanding how most faith communities perceive mental health and suggests opportunities to overcome the tensions between "the pew" and "the couch."
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-013-9731-0