The Moses

In this essay, the author engages the Moses, a sculpture by Michelangelo, as a transformational object. He does so in light of psychoanalytic interpretations of the statue, including Sigmund Freud's (who referred to his essay on the Moses as "a joke"), as well as three psychoanalytic...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Pastoral psychology
Main Author: Carlin, Nathan 1979-
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Published: Springer Science Business Media B. V. [2019]
In:Pastoral psychology
Year: 2019, Volume: 68, Issue: 6, Pages: 619-637
Further subjects:B Christopher Bollas
B Sigmund Freud
B Michelangelo
B Transformational object
B Humor
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Description
Summary:In this essay, the author engages the Moses, a sculpture by Michelangelo, as a transformational object. He does so in light of psychoanalytic interpretations of the statue, including Sigmund Freud's (who referred to his essay on the Moses as "a joke"), as well as three psychoanalytic interpretations after Freud. While drawing on and combining features of all of these psychoanalytic interpretations, the author makes particular use of Moshe Halevi Spero's interpretation to affirm a reading of the Moses as representing a paternal figure who not only gives up his anger (and power to castrate) but also actively nourishes his children like a nursing mother. The author also understands Freud's essay on the Moses to be a form of teasing, which, in part, is why it has been a transformational object for him.
ISSN:1573-6679
Contains:Enthalten in: Pastoral psychology
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s11089-019-00868-3