'Religion' in the Middle East: Implicit and/or Invisible

A personal, reflective account of a probing for indications in the Muslim Middle East of anything resembling 'implicit' religion as noted in the West. Tentative result: initial dismissal of parallels to 'civil' religion, followed by argument that Thomas Luckmann's 'invi...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Implicit religion
Main Author: Lewis, Kevin
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2007]
In:Implicit religion
Year: 2007, Volume: 10, Issue: 1, Pages: 53-65
Further subjects:B Middle East
B Muslims
B Civil Religion
B Religious Life
B Implicit Religion
B Orientalism
Online Access: doi
Description
Summary:A personal, reflective account of a probing for indications in the Muslim Middle East of anything resembling 'implicit' religion as noted in the West. Tentative result: initial dismissal of parallels to 'civil' religion, followed by argument that Thomas Luckmann's 'invisible' rather than an 'implicit' religion theory invites more appropriate consideration when appraising general religious life, as observed by a visiting Western religionist during two extended residencies in first Gaza and then Jordan. Risking a charge of 'orientalism', the conclusion holds that eventually an evolving, eclectic 'invisible' religiousness, responding as it will to steadily seeping Western-powered globalization, will moderate the more extreme forms of reactionary Islamism in the region as it increasingly empowers individualization and subjectivization.
ISSN:1743-1697
Contains:Enthalten in: Implicit religion
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1558/imre.v10.i1.4211