Five-Factor Model Personality Traits and Self-Classified Religiousness and Spirituality

A review of the literature investigating the relationship between religion and spirituality and broad personality traits reveals methodological limitations. The present study sought to contribute to the present literature by investigating differences on personality traits among men and women who ide...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Authors: Lace, John W.; Evans, Luke N.; Merz, Zachary C.; Handal, Paul J.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: [2019-06-01]
In:Journal of religion and health
Year: 2020, Volume: 59, Issue: 3, Pages: 1344-1369
Further subjects:B Big Five
B Religion and spirituality
B Psychology and religion
B Personality traits
Online Access: Verlag
Description
Summary:A review of the literature investigating the relationship between religion and spirituality and broad personality traits reveals methodological limitations. The present study sought to contribute to the present literature by investigating differences on personality traits among men and women who identified as either religious only (R), spiritual only (S), both spiritual and religious (B), or neither spiritual nor religious (N). One thousand thirty-seven (1037) adults (M age = 36.34, SD = 12.62) participated online via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk as part of a larger study and completed the IPIP-NEO-120, Spiritual Transcendence Scale, Duke University Religion Index, and demographic information. Results revealed that men were more likely to identify as R and N than women, and women were more likely to identify as B than men. Women showed more significant differences among Big Five traits than men. Compared to other women, R-women reported the lowest levels of Openness, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism, and highest levels of Extraversion. N-women reported the highest levels of Neuroticism, while S-women reported highest Openness. Among men, R-men reported the lowest Openness, and S-men reported the highest Openness. B-men reported higher Extraversion than N-men. Additionally, Big Five traits appeared to account for significantly more variance in self-reported religiousness for women than men. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are provided and discussed.
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-019-00847-1