European Mennonites and the Holocaust

"Mennonites in the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, and Ukraine lived in communities with Jews and close to various Nazi camps and Holocaust killing sites. As a result of this proximity, Mennonites were neighbours to and witnessed the destruction of European Jews. In some cases they were beneficia...

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Bibliographic Details
Contributors: Jantzen, Mark 1963- (Editor) ; Thiesen, John D. (Editor)
Format: Print Book
Language:English
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Published: Toronto Buffalo London University of Toronto Press [2020]
In:Year: 2020
Volumes / Articles:Show volumes/articles.
Series/Journal:Transnational Mennonite studies
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Europe / World War / National Socialism / Mennonites / Collaboration / Underground movement / Jews
RelBib Classification:AD Sociology of religion; religious policy
KBB German language area
KDH Christian sects
ZC Politics in general
Further subjects:B Collection of essays
B Europe
B Collaborationists
B Mennonites ; Social conditions
B History
B Mennonites (Europe) Social conditions 20th century
B Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
B World War, 1939-1945
B Underground movements, War
B World War, 1939-1945 Underground movements (Europe)
B World War, 1939-1945 Collaborationists (Europe)
B Mennonites (Europe) History 20th century
B World War
B Mennonites
Online Access: Table of Contents
Table of Contents
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Parallel Edition:Electronic
Erscheint auch als: European Mennonites and the Holocaust. - Toronto ; Buffalo ; London : University of Toronto Press : published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2020. - 1487537255. - 9781487537258
Description
Summary:"Mennonites in the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, and Ukraine lived in communities with Jews and close to various Nazi camps and Holocaust killing sites. As a result of this proximity, Mennonites were neighbours to and witnessed the destruction of European Jews. In some cases they were beneficiaries or even enablers of the Holocaust. Much of this history was forgotten after the war, as Mennonites sought to rebuild or find new homes as refugees. The result was a myth of Mennonite innocence and ignorance that connected their own suffering during the 1930s and 1940s with earlier centuries of persecution and marginalization. European Mennonites and the Holocaust identifies a significant number of Mennonite perpetrators, along with a smaller number of Mennonites who helped Jews survive, examining the context in which they acted. In some cases, theology led them to accept or reject Nazi ideals. In others, Mennonites chose a closer embrace of German identity as a strategy to improve their standing with Germans or for material benefit."--
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Includes bibliographical references and index
ISBN:1487525540