Peasants, Pastoralists, and Pax Romana: A Different View

In a recent article in "BASOR", E. B. Banning argued through evidence from the Wadi el-Ḥasā Survey that the relationship between the sedentary and nomadic populations of the region was characterized by beneficial "mutualism" rather than the traditional view of conflict. This pape...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Bulletin of ASOR
Main Author: Parker, S. Thomas (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Fernleihe:Fernleihe für die Fachinformationsdienste
Published: The University of Chicago Press 1987
In: Bulletin of ASOR
Online Access: Volltext (JSTOR)
Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Parallel Edition:Non-electronic
Description
Summary:In a recent article in "BASOR", E. B. Banning argued through evidence from the Wadi el-Ḥasā Survey that the relationship between the sedentary and nomadic populations of the region was characterized by beneficial "mutualism" rather than the traditional view of conflict. This paper contradicts Banning's argument by marshalling literary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence that suggests considerable conflict along the frontier during the Roman/Byzantine period. Although a mutually beneficial relationship between peasants and pastoralists did exist periodically, this was possible only when a strong government effectively policed the frontier.
ISSN:2161-8062
Contains:Enthalten in: American Schools of Oriental Research, Bulletin of ASOR
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.2307/1356805