The Road to an Agreement on Missions: The Quarrel between Portugal and the Holy See Regarding the Missionary Policy for the Portuguese Empire in Africa (c.1880–1910)

Throughout the nineteenth century, Portugal demanded recognition of the so-called ‘historical rights of the Royal Patronage’ by the Holy See as part of its missionary policy for Africa. These claims promptly led to a prolonged conflict over the action of the Propaganda Fide and Portuguese missionary...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion in Africa
Main Author: Dores, Hugo Gonçalves 1983- (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Brill 2021
In: Journal of religion in Africa
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Portugal / Africa / Catholic church, Sancta Sedes / Mission / Politics / Imperialism / History 1880-1910
RelBib Classification:CC Christianity and Non-Christian religion; Inter-religious relations
CG Christianity and Politics
KAH Church history 1648-1913; modern history
KBH Iberian Peninsula
KBN Sub-Saharan Africa
KDB Roman Catholic Church
RJ Mission; missiology
SA Church law; state-church law
Further subjects:B Empire
B Africa
B Concordat
B Mission
B Holy See
B Portugal
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Summary:Throughout the nineteenth century, Portugal demanded recognition of the so-called ‘historical rights of the Royal Patronage’ by the Holy See as part of its missionary policy for Africa. These claims promptly led to a prolonged conflict over the action of the Propaganda Fide and Portuguese missionary achievements. While Lisbon feared the denationalization of missionary work, Rome was concerned about Portugal’s internal policies on religious matters and its perceived inabilities to deal with the missionary challenges of the time, especially the Protestant competition over African hearts and minds. This text follows the discussions between Portugal and the Holy See over the missionary question, examining their confrontational and, apparently, irreconcilable positions, and the attempts made to regulate the exercise of the Royal Patronage through a concordat that became impossible to reach until the conclusion of a fragile and arguable modus vivendi concluded just before the implantation of the Republican regime in 1910.
ISSN:1570-0666
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion in Africa
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1163/15700666-12340200