Vinaya-uttaragrantha のUpāliparipṛcchā, Prātideśanikā 第2–4 条に相当するサンスクリット語断簡

In October 2000, the late Claus VOGEL and Klaus WILLE undertook research on Sanskrit fragments corresponding to the Vinayavibhaṅga of the Mūlasarvāstivādavinaya in a private collection of an anonymous collector from Virginia, United States. However, for personal reasons, they stopped in 2003. Therea...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Bulletin of the International Institute for Buddhist Studies
Subtitles:Sanskrit Fragments from Prātideśanikā 2–4 of the Upāliparip!cchā in the Vinaya-uttaragrantha
Main Author: Shōno, Masanori
Format: Electronic Article
Language:Japanese
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Published: The International Institute for Buddhist Studies of the International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies 2020
In: Bulletin of the International Institute for Buddhist Studies
Year: 2020, Volume: 3, Pages: 91-120
Online Access: Volltext (kostenfrei)
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Summary:In October 2000, the late Claus VOGEL and Klaus WILLE undertook research on Sanskrit fragments corresponding to the Vinayavibhaṅga of the Mūlasarvāstivādavinaya in a private collection of an anonymous collector from Virginia, United States. However, for personal reasons, they stopped in 2003. Thereafter, in October 2011, I was entrusted with the task of identifying and editing the Sanskrit fragments. This paper examines Sanskrit fragments from Prātideśanikā 2–4 of the Upāliparip!cchā in the Vinaya-uttaragrantha belonging to the Mūlasarvāstivādavinaya in the private collection in Virginia. In order to provide an edition and a philological analysis of the fragments, I compare them with the extant Tibetan translation. Buddhism, while Indian in origin, has spread over Asia. Accordingly, Buddhist literature has been transmitted not only in Indo-European languages (Sanskrit, Pāli, Gāndhārī, Tocharian, and so forth), but also in classical Tibetan, classical Chinese, and other Asian languages. However, only a small part of this literature is preserved in the original Sanskrit. Hence, new discoveries of Sanskrit texts make those texts that were previously known only in Tibetan or Chinese translation available in Sanskrit. As shown in this paper, the editing of texts preserved in Sanskrit promotes research on vocabulary, grammar, diction, and syntax.
ISSN:2434-4397
Contains:Enthalten in: Bulletin of the International Institute for Buddhist Studies