THE LASH IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD1: Torture and Citizenry in Medieval Muslim Jurisprudence

Medieval Muslim scholars unequivocally prohibited the torture of prisoners of war out of a concern for maintaining theoretical constructs about the boundaries of the Muslim and non-Muslim communities. Muslim scholars worried that the torturing prisoners of war would compromise values and ideals pred...

Full description

Saved in:  
Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religious ethics
Main Author: Ahmed, Rumee
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
Check availability: HBZ Gateway
Journals Online & Print:
Drawer...
Published: Wiley-Blackwell 2011
In: Journal of religious ethics
Year: 2011, Volume: 39, Issue: 4, Pages: 606-612
Further subjects:B dar
B Islam
B Prisoners of war
B Torture
B Muslim
Online Access: Volltext (JSTOR)
Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Description
Summary:Medieval Muslim scholars unequivocally prohibited the torture of prisoners of war out of a concern for maintaining theoretical constructs about the boundaries of the Muslim and non-Muslim communities. Muslim scholars worried that the torturing prisoners of war would compromise values and ideals predicated on such constructs, and that the demands of citizenship trumped any benefit to the Muslim community that might accrue from torture.
ISSN:1467-9795
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religious ethics
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9795.2011.00497.x