Civil Religion and Other Religious Identities

Civil religion has been conceptualized as an integrative belief system that transcends denominational sectors of the society. However, this claim has remained unsubstantiated. Neither has it been tested whether the unchurched subscribe to civil religion or whether any differential levels of civil re...

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Bibliographic Details
Authors: Wimberley, Ronald C. (Author) ; Christenson, James A. (Author)
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: 1981
In: Sociological analysis
Year: 1981, Volume: 42, Issue: 2, Pages: 91-100
Online Access: Volltext (JSTOR)
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Summary:Civil religion has been conceptualized as an integrative belief system that transcends denominational sectors of the society. However, this claim has remained unsubstantiated. Neither has it been tested whether the unchurched subscribe to civil religion or whether any differential levels of civil religion among religious groupings can be attributed to other social factors. In this study it is found that practically all the respondents share civil religious beliefs irrespective of their Christian religious identities. However, those who claim no church religious identity are exceptions to this consensus. So are Jews and Unitarians. Therefore, these findings help to qualify the hypothesis of a civil religious consensus. Furthermore, the civil religious patterns across the major religious groupings examined here seem minimally effected by extraneous social characteristics.
ISSN:2325-7873
Contains:Enthalten in: Sociological analysis
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.2307/3710588