Seeking Healing for a Mental Illness: Understanding the Care Experiences of Service Users at a Prayer Camp in Ghana

Human rights abuses in mental health care are a global concern. Addressing the problem requires input from key stakeholders, particularly from people using mental health services. This study explored the experiences of persons with mental illness receiving care in a faith-based setting in Ghana. The...

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Bibliographic Details
Published in:Journal of religion and health
Authors: Gyimah, L. ; Ofori-Atta, A. ; Asafo, S. ; Curry, L.
Format: Electronic Article
Language:English
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Published: Springer Science + Business Media B. V. 2023
In: Journal of religion and health
Further subjects:B Service users
B Mental Illness
B Experiences
B Ghana
B Prayer camp
Online Access: Volltext (lizenzpflichtig)
Description
Summary:Human rights abuses in mental health care are a global concern. Addressing the problem requires input from key stakeholders, particularly from people using mental health services. This study explored the experiences of persons with mental illness receiving care in a faith-based setting in Ghana. The study employed a qualitative design, with in-depth interviews (n = 23) and focus groups (n = 18 participants in 3 groups). The constant comparative method of analysis was used to identify themes in participants’ descriptions of their experiences. The first three themes identified are consistent with human rights and coercion, and the last two themes related to service users’ views on participation in spiritual practices. Themes included: decision-making around care; consent and efficacy of religious healing; experiences with chaining; views around biomedical treatment; participation in religious activities as part of healing and recognition of the need for spiritual healing. It was observed that participants with prior experience of psychiatric treatment were happy about the absence of chaining in psychiatric facilities but strongly disliked the side effects of medications. These findings underscore the need for faith-based institutions to provide care that is consistent with patient preferences, thereby helping to address the resultant human rights abuses.
ISSN:1573-6571
Contains:Enthalten in: Journal of religion and health
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1007/s10943-022-01643-0