Spinoza's revelation: religion, democracy, and reason

Nancy Levene reinterprets a major early modern philosopher, Benedict de Spinoza - a Jew who was rejected by the Jewish community of his day but whose thought contains, and critiques, both Jewish and Christian ideas. It foregrounds the connection of religion, democracy, and reason, showing that Spino...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Levene, Nancy (Author)
Format: Electronic Book
Language:English
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Published: Cambridge Cambridge University Press 2004
Reviews:Defending Spinoza? (2006) (Gottlieb, Michah)
Standardized Subjects / Keyword chains:B Spinoza, Benedictus de 1632-1677 / Religious philosophy
B Spinoza, Benedictus de 1632-1677 / Political philosophy
Further subjects:B Spinoza, Benedictus de 1632-1677
B Spinoza, Benedictus de ; 1632-1677
Online Access: Volltext (Resolving-System)
Parallel Edition:Print version: 9780521830706
Description
Summary:Nancy Levene reinterprets a major early modern philosopher, Benedict de Spinoza - a Jew who was rejected by the Jewish community of his day but whose thought contains, and critiques, both Jewish and Christian ideas. It foregrounds the connection of religion, democracy, and reason, showing that Spinoza's theories of the Bible, the theologico-political, and the philosophical all involve the concepts of equality and sovereignty. Professor Levene argues that Spinoza's concept of revelation is the key to this connection, and above all to Spinoza's view of human power. This is to shift the emphasis in Spinoza's thought from the language of amor Dei (love of God) to the language of libertas humana (human freedom) without losing either the dialectic of his most striking claim - that man is God to man - or the Jewish and Christian elements in his thought. Original and thoughtfully argued, this book offers fresh insights into Spinoza's thought
Vera religio -- Superstition -- The God of the philosophers -- Spinoza's God -- Man is God to man -- Spinoza's Bible: concerning how it is that "scripture, insofar as it contains the word of God, has come down to us uncorrupted" -- Why the Bible -- Prophecy, or revelation -- Interpretation -- The Bible and the sacred -- Politics, law, and the multitude -- The politics of the multitude -- Law -- Obedience -- Freedom -- Reason, revelation, and the case of the Hebrews -- The pacts -- Election, divine and human -- The love of God
Item Description:Title from publisher's bibliographic system (viewed on 05 Oct 2015)
ISBN:0511488440
Persistent identifiers:DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511488443